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burnra
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I am trying to find the solubility of iron in an aqueous solution combined with CO2 at partial pressure of around 4 ATM it is also in contact with Glycol and various other standard formation water products. The main gas (Methane) would be at say 80ATM







I need to be able to calculate the iron solubility in mg/L (ppm) at various temps (10-120C) .







Could you point me in the right direction to enable me to do this in GWB





I am trying to find the solubility of iron in an aqueous solution combined with CO2 at partial pressure of around 4 ATM it is also in contact with Glycol and various other standard formation water products. The main gas (Methane) would be at say 80ATM







I need to be able to calculate the iron solubility in mg/L (ppm) at various temps (10-120C) .







Could you point me in the right direction to enable me to do this in GWB



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Guest Melika Sharifi

Dear Burna,

 

Thanks for your message. I would suggest that you start with SpecE8 app to calculate the equilibrium state of your system at each temperature. Using SpecE8, you can calculate the equilibrium distribution of aqueous species in a fluid, the fluid's saturation state with respect to minerals, etc. As for your gases, you can set the fugacity, but not the partial pressure, of gases in the current release. At relatively low pressure, however, they are close to the same.

 

If you know the iron mineral that is controlling solubility in your system, you can swap it into the basis. To include inorganic carbon, methane, and glycol constraints in your calculations, you’ll likely need to decouple some redox pairs depending on the thermo dataset you are using .

 

For more information on using SpecE8, basis swapping, and decoupling, please read sections 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 7.1, 7.2, and 7.3 in the GWB Essentials Guide. You can access the GWB guides from the Help menu of any GWB app.

 

Once you’re comfortable with using SpecE8, you might set up a sliding temperature path in React, which is a very convenient way to scan over a range of temperatures. If you fix the fugacity of your gases as you trace the simple polythermal path, you’ll be able to accomplish in a single React run what you would with several discrete SpecE8 calculations.

 

Bests,

Melika Sharifi

Aqueous Solutions LLC

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