Jump to content
Geochemist's Workbench Support Forum

Using intial perm and porosity values in React


 Share

Recommended Posts

I am working on a carbon sequestration project. I am wanting to to simulate a flow through reaction model which I guess could only be done using the React program. I also used the X1t program to to conduct a "Closed system or continuosly stirred tank reactor (CSTR) which does allow the fluid to back react with precipitated solids as the reaction progresses. In the X1t program, it allows me to set initial TDS, permeability, and porosity values. But, the React program doesn't. Or maybe there is a way but I haven't figured it out yet. The React program does calculate a porosity and permeability values based on fluid/rock parameter inputs which is not reflecting the initial values that I want.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

Jay

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jay,

 

Permeability is not currently calculated or used in React. Porosity, if the command is enabled, is calculated from the system's fluid and mineral volumes. It's not really used in any way by React, but you can plot how this porosity changes during a reaction path due to mineral precipitation or dissolution, for example.

 

You can start with some simple configurations in React before you construct a more complicated reactive transport model accounting for flow through a porous medium. Depending on what exactly it is you're interested in, you might use a flow-through path or a flush model. In the flow-through case, you follow a packet of fluid which reacts with an aquifer as it migrates. Any minerals that form as reaction products are left behind and isolated from further reaction. A flush model, on the other hand, tracks the evolution of a system (rock grains and pore fluid) through which the fluid migrates. At each step in the model, an increment of unreacted fluid is added to the system, displacing the existing pore fluid.

 

The flow-through and flush configurations in React are basically simplifications of what can be done with reactive transport models. A reactive transport model, since it predicts the distribution in space and time of the chemical reactions that occur along a flowpath, will give a more detailed representation of your system, though it is of course more difficult to set up.

 

Chapter 2 in the Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling textbook discusses these various classes of models further.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Brian Farrell

Aqueous Solutions LLC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Hi Brian,

 

Yes this helps. A colleague of mine created a flow through simulation model and was wondering how he was getting his porosity values.

 

Thank you very much.

 

Jay

 

 

Hi Jay,

 

Permeability is not currently calculated or used in React. Porosity, if the command is enabled, is calculated from the system's fluid and mineral volumes. It's not really used in any way by React, but you can plot how this porosity changes during a reaction path due to mineral precipitation or dissolution, for example.

 

You can start with some simple configurations in React before you construct a more complicated reactive transport model accounting for flow through a porous medium. Depending on what exactly it is you're interested in, you might use a flow-through path or a flush model. In the flow-through case, you follow a packet of fluid which reacts with an aquifer as it migrates. Any minerals that form as reaction products are left behind and isolated from further reaction. A flush model, on the other hand, tracks the evolution of a system (rock grains and pore fluid) through which the fluid migrates. At each step in the model, an increment of unreacted fluid is added to the system, displacing the existing pore fluid.

 

The flow-through and flush configurations in React are basically simplifications of what can be done with reactive transport models. A reactive transport model, since it predicts the distribution in space and time of the chemical reactions that occur along a flowpath, will give a more detailed representation of your system, though it is of course more difficult to set up.

 

Chapter 2 in the Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling textbook discusses these various classes of models further.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Brian Farrell

Aqueous Solutions LLC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...